Thursday, April 8, 2010

Grinds for the Garden

Easter Weekend provided us with some extra coffee grounds which we don't usually have. The weather was so beautiful that the coffee was enjoyed in the garden and the grounds will be enjoyed by the garden. Coffee (and tea too) act as a slow release fertilizer and are a fine amendment to the compost pile. We toss them in filter and all. We will mix coffee grinds in with the soil of our houseplants as coffee adds nitrogen. Plants that thrive in acidic soil such as azaleas, rhododendrons, hydrangeas, raspberries, and lily of the valley will benefit from the addition of coffee grounds to the soil. Many books indicate that coffee grounds help to repel slugs but we haven't found that to be true in our garden. Coffee grinds help feed the garden worms too...... but I haven't read any studies whether the caffeine helps them to aerate the soil faster.... perhaps!?

Also, a very special thank you to BIL Phil for replacing the wooden slats and stabilizing the almost but not quite fifteen year old compost bin. It was beginning to show its age, but with his skillful handiwork, it is once again fully functional.

4 comments:

parTea lady said...

I put my loose tea leaves in the garden, but never thought to use my hubby's coffee grinds. We aren't big gardeners and don't have a compost bin, but we should probably consider it.

Kathleen said...

I have been putting coffee grounds, filter and all, in the compost pile for years. Thanks for the helpful hint for those who might not have thought about it. :)

Marilyn said...

Yes, our tea goes in the compost bin too. Lovely to be able to get a second benefit from coffee grounds and spent tea leaves.

*Ulrike* said...

I always put mine in the compost pile, because come fishing season I know where to find the worms!